This is Not Your Grandma’s Crochet….What!?

I’ve got a bit of a bone to pick today….why is it so popular to advertise that this is “Not Your Grandma’s Crochet” or “Not Your Grandma’s Knitting” lately!?

Grandmother Knitting

Not Your Grandma’s Knitting!?

Now I totally understand that yarn crafts tend to carry a stigma with them….It’s the kind of stigma that has all my acquaintances thinking I sit at home underneath a dim reading lamp, crocheting a lace doily using off-white yarn, with curlers in my hair and giant reading glasses on.  Though they’re not that far off on the reading glasses part (ha!), the rest is total stereotyping.  The term “Not You Grandma’s….” is just an attempt to let people know that the traditional thoughts about knitters and crocheters are far from the truth these days.

A more modern crafter may be a young mother keeping her hands busy while watching the kids play outside.  Or maybe she’s a trendy grandmother making the most adorable photography props for her new granddaughter’s first photos.  Or maybe she’s even doing exactly what people imagine….quietly knitting a doily by the light of a lamp.  Whatever the case, it’s clear that you and I don’t just knit or crochet for purely practical purposes anymore.  We pull from our unique styles to create something that we consider a masterpiece.  We aren’t just crafters.  We’re artists.

With that said, though, I’m still just not a fan of the phrase “Not Your Grandma’s.”  I guess it may be because my Grandma was entirely NOT crafty, or that the crafting Grandmas I look up to (my husband’s two amazing Grandmothers) are so incredibly amazing at their crafts that they’re all I can aspire to be one day.

These are the people who passed down the wonderful abilities that we possess today.  They’re the women who taught us to sit still long enough to bring a vision to life and enjoy the fruits of our own labor.  They’re the ones who gave us the skills to pass on to our children, and to make the current trendy projects that we’re working on.  They made our babies clothes and blankies so intricate that we can only hope to do the same for our grandbabies someday, and they’ve given every member of the family some amazingly special handmade piece from throws, to purses, to socks.

These women ROCK!

So I’m thinking we need to start a movement.  Perhaps instead of “Not Your Grandma’s Knitting” we should say “You Should Wish it Were as Good as Your Grandma’s Knitting” or maybe “Evolutionized From Grandma’s Crochet” or perhaps “Far From Your Grandma’s Style, Yet Still Uses a Hook and Yarn.”

I think for me personally, I’ll start saying, “Striving to Become Your Grandma’s.”

 

What are your thoughts?  Do you use the phrase “Not Your Grandma’s…” and if so, what does it mean to you?

 

82 Comments On “This is Not Your Grandma’s Crochet….What!?”

  1. We crocheter’s and knitter’s are the best!!!!

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  2. Most of my knitting is my Grandmother’s knitting. She liked many of the same kinds of yarn and patterns as I do. Most people who use that expression seem to be afraid of growing old, or are trying to avoid growing up at all.

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  3. Your blog is the best! I just love the person you are. You are young but appreciate tradition and value family. I adored my grandmother, she died before she could teach me to crochet. However, always loved being crafty. Learned to sew in high school, do counted cross stretch, knitting, and all kinds of crafts. Like you, I would consider myself lucky to be compared to my Mom Mom.

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  4. I can only say I wish it was my Grandma Bare’s knitting. She was the best and she was the inspiration for Pammy’s Bare Beanie.

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  5. My grandma taught me how to knit.She taught me many other things as well sewing, cooking, baking, caning…She was my everything. She recently passed away 10 months ago and there isn’t a week that goes by that I pick up the phone to go call her and then suddenly realize she’s gone. I’m proud to say “it’s my grandma’s knitting!” Her legacy will continue God willing if I’m blessed to have a daughter one day.
    Thank you for your wonderful blog.

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  6. I alwAys thought that phrase was more referring to all the wonderful advancements in techniques and sharing of the knowledge that has come a out since our Grandmas time. We have many more tips and even new stitches and techniques who h have been developed and shared wordlwide. THANKS to the invention of the internet, we now have easier access to videos which can show us alternative ways to cast in and off, or hold our Yarn around our neck or learn left handed techniques – add to that a plethora of other thibgs5our grandma’s could only learn by way of mouth,thus limiting what was,truly available to them. I dunno. I guess I saw “Not you Grandma’s Crochet/Knitting” as more of a challenge and a compliment than a derogatory remark. I see that ograse5and I think..ooo.. challenge accepted!

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  7. Personally my Grandma knits and quilts and I envy her skill at them both… I haven’t been able to do either and it makes me so sad… I am the ONLY one outside of my Great Great Grandma who crochets in our family though… She used to do the most stunning doilies I only wish I might one day be so skilled as she was!!!! For now I settle for what I can do and keep working on expanding my skill set ?

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  8. The phrase Not Your Grandma’s….anything is just a sad reminder to me of the many art forms like knitting, crochet, sewing, that are dying out. My grandmother taught me so many things and these beautiful art forms are some of my favorites.

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  9. Not your grandma’s. It’s better.

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  10. I never knew either of my grandma’s both died long before I came to being. My mum taugh me to knit. I wish I had a grandma then I may have learned to crochet by the fireside as a tot as well!

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  11. I am a grandma who has knit since my early 20’s. I have knitted for my children and now for my grandchildren. It is one of the most relaxing hobbies there is.

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  12. It was actually my Gran who taught me to knit. She wasn’t really a crafter, and she didn’t knit garments or accessories that I’m aware of in my childhood, but possibly with her own children. She taught me how to knit and purl, that’s all I needed to know really. Once I had my own kids, I knit them sweaters. Not many, and funny enough, no hats or mittens. When I was expecting our first grandchild, that is when I really got my inspiration and started knitting again. I like to try new stitches and will tackle projects with great gusto. Amazing how learning the simple knit & purl stitches can take you on such a wonderful journey. I am so grateful my Dear Gran taught me knitting and so much more.

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  13. My maternal grandfather knit as a means of coping with PTSD from WWl. My father at some point, in their courtship days sewed my mother a bikini.

    I still have a dress knit for me by my grandfather when I was about 3 yrs old. Sadly, by the time it arrived, I had grown out of it. By the time I received it for my daughter, she had grown out of it. I have it stored, waiting to be worn.

    Neither of my grandmothers did crafts, knit, crochet or whatever. My mother was famous for starting projects (once every 5 years) and then never finishing them.

    As a child I tried to teach myself how to knit but was unable to make sense of most of the directions and my mother was not supportive in teaching me.

    My (ex) mother-in-law tried to teach me how to knit when I was pregnant with my 1st. Poor woman, very religious, I sent her to swearing and telling me that I was unteachable. Irregardless, I was inspired by my mother-in-laws ability to knit sweaters for her ever-growing brood of grand-children and clothing for toys without using patterns. She had mad-skillz.

    Well, I persevered and now I knit in a frenzy. I always have 5x’s more yarn and 3x’s the needed patterns for a simple road trip. I knit in line… any line. I knit in drive-throughs if the line is long enough.I usually have knitting with me when going out for dinner, or to visit with friends; and always for appointments or when running errands.

    When I knit now, I feel more of a connection to my grandfather than ever before. I adored him immensely despite only seeing him a few times in my life (He was in England, I was in Canada), but he always made me feel important. Oddly enough, I have anxiety and depression, and knitting does help me to keep a step ahead of it (usually).

    Time has proven (sadly) that few of my friends actually appreciate the effort and expense that goes into my knit items. I have grand-children that I don’t get to see (family games erm politics). So, since I can’t connect with my own, I knit for others. I knit 3D animal hats for children aged 4-9 who are battling cancer. I try and get inspirational message hats in there as well, “I Am Amazing” or the like.

    I probably went way out to left field with my response. I get distrac……… SQUIRREL!

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  14. If it weren’t for my grandma, I wouldn’t be the knitter/crocheter I am today!! She taught me to knit and crochet(among other crafts and sewing, quilting, etc) as a child and we spent many a wonderful hour crafting together. My love of all things fiber related comes straight from those happy days. Now as a grandmother myself, I can’t wait until I can pass on that joy!

    Rock on all you Grannies out there! I hope it will always be “My Grandmas Knitting and Crochet”!!!

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  15. Not your Grandma’s…. is not a phrase that I have ever liked. I did not have Grandmas who passed crocheting onto me and my mother did not crochet. I came to crocheting on my own. I do have immense respect for the Grandmas who have passed their craft to the next generation. I find Not your Grandma’s…. disrespectful, even although I am sure it is not meant to be.

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  16. I would never use that phrase. My Grandma taught me to knit when I was 7 and I may never have come to love fibre arts as much as I do without her influence. I still remember the first things I knit – a clutch sort of wallet for my mum and a man’s wallet for my dad.

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  17. My sister was the crocheters, but I couldn’t learn from her. (8 years youngerr, me).
    So taught my self from a book after I married. Then met some Americans and I loved their books and the fact they crocheted anything! So I flew from then! Can’t understand why I’m frequently told people don’t do that any more! So I tell them otherwise!
    Love my crocheting and couldn’t live without it!

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  18. My grandmother taught me to knit starting at the age of 4. She handed me a knitting nancy and showed me how to make cord. I used the cord to make doll clothing and blankets and carpets which means I learned to hand sew as well. By the time I was 6, my grandmother handed me knitting needles and showed me how to knit in the round. We were farmers, so she knit socks, mittens, hats, through the winter and on summer evenings after chores were done. She did a bit of crochet, but knitting was what she did. It had more uses. I taught myself how to crochet as a teenager in the 70’s. The yarns that local stores sold was horrible LOL but I persevered.
    After I got married and my kids came along, I was crocheting for them. I went back to knitting when my son was born premature with the tiniest head and I couldn’t find a hat to fit him.
    My grandmother also taught me to sew using a very old Singer pedal machine. She would repair the canvas tarps for the grain thresher with that machine! It was a beast 🙂 but it could sew the straightest seam through the thinnest fabric without a pucker or a snag.
    I put those skills to good use making my children’s school clothing and remodeling previous year’s fashions to fit the newest for the fall. My daughter still shops in second hand shops and remodels her clothing the same way I did for her as a child.
    After adopting my 2nd daughter, I learned I was about to become a grandma. I picked up my knitting needles and got busy with socks, mittens, hats, scarves, hoodies, sweaters. Then my 2nd grandchild came along, a girl and it was time to knit all those beautiful dresses!
    I taught my 2nd daughter how to crochet and knit. She vastly prefers crochet over knitting and loves to create her own patterns.
    For me, it depends what I’m making. Certain things make more sense to be knit and others are better in crochet.
    Not my grandmother’s anything to me sounds like something lesser, because whatever my grandmother made, she made with much care and always made sure it was as perfect as she could make it.
    I may upset some people, but I think it needs saying….
    Today I see so many designers using heavy worsted weight yarns to make clothing for babies and toddlers. To me, I see that as Not my grandma’s work since she would have used fingering or sock weight yarn to make those same garments. Sacrificing quality in order to make things faster is not always the best answer. <3

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  19. Unfortunately I was brought up with no grandparents both sides. My mother taught me to crochet and my eldest sister knitting. My luck I have no daughters only boys who are so busy with their own lives the only time I see them is breakfast. My eldest has a 7 year old son who loves everything I make him to the point he Loves modeling I think my grandson wants to be a Model.

    One thing since been a mom and a grandmother it’s whole different world out their for buying clothes. You will always see me either knitting, crocheting and sewing my family their clothes. Measuring even their friends would buy their own wool so I make what they ask they even give me extra pocket money.

    The other day I had just finished making myself a long hooded jacket was looking out the garage door when I saw my sister wearing it grrr. Even some of the neighbors have approached and asked if I can make something.

    I love mixing up some of the patterns I see and download them. I’m a mum a grandmother on a fashion mission and loving it

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  20. My grandma didn’t knit or crochet but she made the most amazing quilts. I could sit and watch her for hours trying to figure out how she made those stitches so tiny by hand. That is where my love of fiber arts came from. My neighbor taught me how to crochet. My mom knit but I could never get the hang of casting on (until I found Melody) and I taught myself how to cross stitch. Now I am a grandma and love making things for my grandkids. Everyone at work wants my crocheted baby blankets. So it may not be my grandma’s crochet but it certainly came from her.

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  21. I have a crafy grandPA. He crocheted beautiful afgans for my brother and I when we graduated high school, and another when my oldest child was born.

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  22. Both of my grandmothers were knitters and crocheters and taught me their craft. Some of my best memories of them are those times. I never fail to think of them when I pick up a hook or needles!

    I took up tatting in my teens because neither one knew how to and I thought it would be cool to learn something those amazing ladies didn’t know.

    I have passed my skills down to my granddaughter and feel such an amazing connection across the generations. I love to craft gifts for special occasions just like my grandmothers did!

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  23. I’ve been crocheting and knitting for 60 years. I am still learning new techniques. The CALs that are available now have really challenged my knowledge of stitches. I thinking the trends in yarn art are changing. I have created many beautiful things for my children and grandchildren. It’s sad now that some moms don’t want homemade for their babies and don’t use the beautiful items that are made for them. Some grandmas are getting very discouraged and aren’t making things for the new little ones. They have been greatly disappointed and hurt when their work is not appreciated. I think we should be saying “lucky enough to be Grandmas.”

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  24. My little Grammy crocheted with thread and made many amazing things. I now get to use her hooks and thread to make beautiful things. My mom taught me how to crochet and has informed me that I am like my Grammy when it comes to crocheting. Crocheting and knitting is for all ages and I am happy that I take after my Grammy

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  25. I am a grandma of 14, great grandma of 3. They range in age from 27 down to 9 months of age. I’ve made a lot of things for them from hats that they wanted,(owls and angry bird) to doll clothes to purses that they loved. Now they’ve asked me to make them all fingerless gloves and I’m making the 4 Year old a lot of small sea creatures that he will love. One of my favorite things was a penguin bowling set which I wish I could remember the designer so I could give her credit. Another favorite is a hate with a helicopter cross stitched on it…don’t remember who that designer is either.Another favorite of my ds’ daughters is Bible covers with pocket for their notepads and pens. Not something that a lot of young children would probably ask for. Anyway, nothing old fashioned unless they request it. My grandma didn’t knit or crochet. I’ve taught several of my grands including a grandson to crochet.

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  26. My right handed grandma taught this southpaw to crochet more than 30 years ago. All of her great grandchildren have afghans she made for them,and some of he great-greats as well. At 90, she still sits with hook and yarn and makes lovely things. I hope my crochet will always be my grandmother’s crochet!

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  27. To me “Not your grandma’s” means not as good as grandma’s.
    I still have things that my grandmother knit, crocheted and sewed for me. Each of her 14 grandkids got an afghan when they finished high school. She made me things like ponchos, hair ties, dolls and vests. I hope to someday be as skilled as my grandma.
    I did not start crocheting until I was in my 40’s. Not to many years ago I saw a pattern for the curly hair ties my grandma made for me. I made some for a niece, and when the neighbor girl saw them, she wanted some too! She was 10!
    I enjoy making things for my grandkids. Especially toys. They are all under 5. I made many Disney Princesses for one granddaughter before she was born, and my daughter’s friends at the shower wanted some too. I made Star Wars characters for a grandson, and a friends kid.
    Some day I hope to be as skilled as my grandmother was, but I don’t know if that will ever happen.

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  28. YC,
    I enjoyed reading your comment. I, too, taught myself. You might like the website LeftInKnots.com. I made a granddaughter the stuff and dump fish bowl set for her first birthday, and she loves it. I love Melody’s Makings, and read lots of others too.

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  29. Actually the grandmother I knew wasn’t crafty. I never knew my other grandmother because she died when my dad was young. My mom did sewing and cake decorating. I’m a grandma and crochet, loom knit, sew, and occasionally decorate cakes. I’ve never used that phrase. My granddaughter wants to learn crochet and sewing.

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  30. What I make today may not be the same as my Grandma’s but I have her to thank for my crochet skills. When I was about 5 years old she taught me to crochet a chain. When we would visit on the weekends I would go with her to her job as a night telephone operator in a small town. There wasn’t much to do there so she would crochet–doilies, sweaters, ponchos, etc. Because I begged to do it too she showed me how to make a chain. I didn’t really use my skills much until several years later when I learned other stitches from her and pushed myself to learn more from patterns. Now I’m the grandma and great grandma and I enjoy making things for my grand and great grand kids. I have tried to teach my youngest granddaughter to crochet but it doesn’t hold her interest for long. Maybe when she is a little older it will be important for her.

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  31. I was taught to crochet by my Granny Creasser. Looking at vintage patterns I can say, today’s patterns are much more intricate. I’m just happy my Granny gave me the basics I needed or I wouldn’t be making the dolls and toys I am today!

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  32. One grandmother knitted, the other crochet. My mom learned to knit at classes that I would tag along. Being in the 10-12 age bracket, I really didn’t care. Then I got my first job with a childhood friend who knit and crochet. It took off from there. I became a mom, knit and crochet his hats and mitten, and sewed some of his clothes. Became a Auntie, they got the sweaters, hats mittens and blankets. Became a grandma, well look out. Yes, the hats, mittens, scarves, sweaters and toys. My oldest grandson, (10) willlet me know ahead of time what color hat he wants for Christmas. Now I’m starting to enter my things in local fairs.

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  33. My thoughts exactly.

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  34. If you’re lucky and truly blessed, crafty mommas turn into crafty grandmas! I didn’t know how to crochet when my kiddos were young, but we spent wonderful hours together “crafting”. Once they were grown and out of the house, I reverted to my roots. I wanted to make for my grandkids, the same wonderful crocheted gifts that my grandmother made for me, my siblings and cousins. So I learned – or am still learning – how to crochet. My kids, grandkids, co-workers kids, parents, siblings and charities now enjoy my crochet efforts. I always tell everyone that my offerings are made with more love than skill and no one seems to mind the little mistakes. So, there’s a special place in people’s hearts for “crafty grandmas”. So I say no matter your age or status, craft your way and don’t listen to what others may say!

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  35. I believe my grandmother used to crochet when she was younger but stopped for whatever reason. I don’t have any daughters to teach and pass it down to, but I’ll pass all the other craftiness to them as they’re interested. Watch out if the Universe puts a Grandma in my path who crochets or even knits, I promise to soak up any little bit of info she’ll give. I’ve ran into a few in the yarn section at Michael’s and listened as long as she had the time. One thing I miss most about my Grands is sitting listening to them talk about how they grew up back in their day. Hold those Grandparents tight and get infused with whatever you can while they’re still around! Do you know how many years they had to get it right?! Ok…You brought back all the good stuff with this one…..Thanks!

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  36. I was lucky enough to have one of my Grandmothers teach me how to crochet and try to teach me knitting, as well. Unfortunately, she passed away before she was able to work with me on tatting, as she had planned to. She was not able to read a pattern. But had the amazing ability to look at finished item, then go home and recreate it in either knit, crochet or tatting, from memory! She passed away when I was 10 years old, only two years after she started teaching me to crochet and knit. I wish she’d been able to work with me more on my knitting. I guess God needed her more in heaven to help out there.

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  37. I am a grandma who loves to crochet and crafts. Most of my projects are donated to children in needy, and also for disable people and cancer patients (I’m a cancer survivor). My next project is to crochet an afghan (and a hat) with blue stripe for a policeman who will be retired this year.
    Through the years, I collected thousands of crochet and craft patterns I would love to share with a Crochet Pal.
    Doing crafts, I found it is so relaxing and challenging at the same time, especially by dealing with advanced patterns.
    The day after I retired, I went to Michaels and almost emptied all shelves with yarn. It was a ‘sweet revenge’ for the lost time when working so many years without time for crocheting.
    People who crochet or knit are special people.They put hearts and so much love in making things for others. Nothing better than the thing is made by hands not machine.
    Crochet Hugs for everyone!

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  38. My grandmother taught me to crochet lace edges on handkerchiefs when I would visit her in the summertime. As I grew up and my grandma passed, I forgot how satisfying it was to work with a hook and some thread/yarn. I was lucky enough to have a friend to reintroduce me to crocheting again in young adulthood and have loved it ever since. Now I am the grandmother sitting and crocheting under a lamp with glasses on, and my granddaughter loves the things I make but doesn’t seem to love the art itself. Oh well, I will just sit here and enjoy my retirement and peacefully hook away…..

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  39. I don’t care for that phrase,”Not your Grandma’s”, but I thought it might refer to granny squares. My grandma taught me how to sew and crochet when I was 10 years old and I am now 87 years young. I taught myself how to knit when I was 15. I like crochet the best.Have made many items over the years, really enjoy making baby items, dolls and doll clothes.Have made many things without patterns as my grandma taught me to do.I remember seeing my grandma crochet with her eyes closed, that’s how good she was. My Mother also did crochet and knitting. Oh yes we all also did embroidery work. When I was a child we lived in snow country in Michigan in the country and would get snowed in so everyone did needlework even the men as we listened to the radio, no tv then. what great memories. Now I crochet while watching tv. happy crocheting everyone 🙂

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  40. I too feel it’s a disrespectful term. Although I agree that it may just be referring to the new skills and techniques discovered today. My grandmother taught me to crochet when I was around 6 yrs old. My dad’s twin sister taught me to knit when I was 50 yrs. I now enjoy knitting best but am most experienced with crochet. I have been hurt by making a gift and never seeing the clothing used or a picture of the child in it. I love making baby things. People always make good remarks on my things and occasionally someone asks me to make something for them or for a gift. I’ve decided that unless it’s for a family member, I’m not giving away anything else now. Time is too precious to be taking for granted. That being said, I will still donate to good causes at hospitals that ask. People in need seem to be more appreciative. My family are very appreciative and ask me to make things all the time and they do get used. That’s what makes me happy! My two daughters crochet. One is very good at it and makes blankets as gifts for babies of friends. Love that she is continuing the tradition!

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  41. My grandmother wasn’t a knitter or crocheter. It was my mother who taught me to crochet. I learned to knit on my own on my own as an adult before the computer became a common and most helpful tool. It took me a long time to figure out DPNs. Now I’m a grandma who knits and crochets for my grandchildren. At this time of year I begin to knit lots of hats, mittens and scarves for the new school year. My four grandchildren always love to see what grandma comes up with.

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  42. Never knew my Grandmas but Mom crocheted. Most of my projects are for my Grandchildren, Great- Grandchildren and my friends Grandchildren.I also do some hats and scarfs for charity.

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  43. I would be so proud to say “Just like my Grandma’s” if I could! My grandmother is the one that taught me how to crochet and tried to teach me how to knit. I was only 6 years old and apparently I only had the patience for crochet at that time. They lived in Vermont and we lived in Illinois so I only had lessons with her during our extended summer stays and sometimes during Christmas break. Unfortunately, she passed away when I was only 12 so I didn’t spend a lot of time with her but it was all time well spent. She filled me with a wealth of knowledge that carried me through all these years. I just remember my grandmother making me crochet a chain stitch until my stitches were perfect. In the end, that chain was so long we could have wrapped it around their entire house! That is the one thing she always stressed …practice makes perfect.

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  44. I first learned to crochet & knitting when I was 5 by my grandmother but as I grew older I lost interest and it wasn’t until recently and many years after she had passed that I became interested but wished I had her afghan that was on her sofa. I retaught myself crochet by watching learning videos on Red Heart.com so that now I’m making xmas gifts for my grandchildren also I have over the years made custom gift baskets for various family members along with scratch baking throughout the year primarily the fall. My next thing to relearn is knitting.

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  45. Well, I only knew only one grandma and she didn’t knit or crochet. My mother knew how to knit when she married my dad, but didn’t have time to keep it up after the kids started coming (I was 1st of 6). So…when crochet enjoyed a little resurgence in the early 70’s, my friend and I taught ourselves how to crochet by making those “TRENDY” ponchos (while waiting for chemistry experiments to do their thing in college lab – haha). After that, I started making doilies (I was only 21), but I loved working with thread crochet! Then Annie’s Attic came out with Barbie Doll clothes crochet patterns, and my little sisters were just the right age with Barbie Dolls. What fun!! I actually taught my mother-in-law to crochet after I got married in the 70s. I’ve crocheted my share of shawls, afghans, and other things, but I have the most fun crocheting things like a unicorn hat for my 4-yr old great niece and dragon hat for her twin brother. I also crochet jewelry (made with thread) for gifts and auctions. My favorites are made with roses. My yarn stash is pretty huge, and now I’m getting into yarn wall hangings (a little bit of crochet in some) and dream catchers. I even tried a crochet wall hanging. I taught my daughter how to crochet when she was 8, and in college she started making things without patterns. She’s also learned how to knit and always has a project going in one or the other – or both. We both enjoy craft shopping and look for new and fun things to make. Yes, I have 2 grown grandchildren, and I am a Granny, but I’ve always wondered about that phrase; it’s probably made up by someone who never understood how satisfying “yarning” can be. I’m personally delighted that there are so many new crocheters and knitters “out there” who are designing and promoting these wonderful crafts!

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  46. I AM the grandma who is knitting and some easy crochet pieces for my new grand daughter – it’s my pleasure to do so!

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  47. Well i am a grandma only 43 but a grandma still i learned when i was 6 from my great grandmother but she only made shawls purses and blankets. I use thread yarn from germany and make stuffed animals and many other things the saying not your grandmas crochet is true they didnt make the elegant elaborate things we do now at least most didnt

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  48. I AM a grandmother of 6! I learned to crochet when I was about 10 and back then the phrase was probably appropriate. Crochet (and knitting) has come so very far since then that there is no longer any “Grandma’s crochet”. It’s all amazing. Even granny “squares” have evolved into different shapes with overlays and flowers, etc.
    So forget the cliches and let’s create beautiful crochet items!

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  49. My fraternal grandma knitted…she encouraged me when frustration on even stitches overwhelmed my efforts…I still have the mini dress she knitted for me my sophomore year at The Ohio State University. (Now as an insulin-dependent diabetic, it serves as my goal…to wear it as a tunic now that I’ve found a diet to combat insulin weight, as well as cut down on the amount of insulin used.)This dress had panels of cabling…GORGEOUS! I have mastered even stitches; she was correct; practice makes perfect. My maternal grandmother made THE most beautiful decorative pleated pillows; recently, I found a pattern for these pillows at the fabric store. It will take me a bit to figure it out, BUT I always wanted one of those pillows. Now I will make it in her honor. How did I learn to embroider, knit, crochet, and sew? My mother did not want to pay for TWO swim lessons a week during the summer, said I needed to learn something else besides swim! LOVE MY CREATIVITY!!!

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  50. My mommy’s mother crocheted when I spent some time with my grandparents in the summer “Mom” (what we called her not grandma) would crochet while watching tv and I would watch her as a young girl. Dad’s mother done tatting at least that’s what I learnt later in life. My mommy taught me how to crochet in 1976, I was carrying my last baby. I did learn to make baby blankets, bibs and taught myself how to read patterns. Hubby was active duty Air Force so I would send Mommy home the first item I would make from a pattern and send enough for her to give to each f my sisters one older and 3 younger than me. I didn’t know she kept the ones I made and she made the same things I did by just looking at the item. She gave me some of the older patterns she had and couldn’t read, she told me “you are better at crocheting than me any day.” Told her no way when all she had to do was look at the items I made and be able to make them, now I am looking at a pair of slippers she made and trying my best to make them like hers close but not as good as hers. I really miss mommy, we lost her almost 9 years ago. I can still hear her tell me “stop looking for mistakes in the stand covers I made you, didn’t make them for you to find mistakes just for you to enjoy and to make your home prettier.” then we would laugh. Yes, mommy always said you can do anything you set your mind to and practice makes perfect.

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  51. Oh, by the way, I am a mother of 3 boys and a girl, Oma of 8 grandsons and 1 granddaughter, great Oma of 2 great grandsons and 2 great granddaughters and the 3rd great granddaughter due Nov 19. I crochet for each and everyone from the oldest to the youngest.

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  52. I could only wish my crochet was more like my grandmas. She made beautiful lace for pillow cases and doilies. Mostly I learned from my mom though.

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  53. My grandmother crocheted. I still have some things she made. Now I am a grammy and make things for my little ones.

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  54. Grandma’s Crochet 2.0, or Grandma’s Knitting 2.0, lol

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  55. My Grandmother “Mema” was a sewer. She loved to make quilts, quilted animals, and doll clothes. I partially learned to crochet from my mother and finally got the hang of it with a self-learning book. She also sewed, quilted, embroidered, and other various crafts. All of my female relatives sewed, crocheted, knitted, or embroidered so these crafts were handed down to all of the grandchildren and nieces. I am so glad to come from a family of sewers, crocheters, knitters, creative crafters, etc. These are so relaxing to do and give to friends and family.

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  56. I am a knitting Mimi. My grandmother died before I was born. My mother taught me to knit when I was a child. I taught my daughters, but they don’t have time to knit now. My grandchildren have growing collections of toys, hats, etc that I have made for them. My oldest grandchild is 6 and I’m looking forward to teaching her to knit.
    I agree with the people who wish it was my grandmother’s or mother’s knitting.

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  57. My grandmother crocheted as did my great grandmother. I did not learn from either of them. I taught myself to knit and now appreciate the simple projects that they did much more!

    My husband’s grandmother quilted. When we were first married, like everyone else in the family, we received a wedding quilt (still have it, 30 years later) and rather than ask her to make me more quilts – I asked her to teach me to quilt. We were instantly fast friends and have enjoyed a close relationship since we met. She was encouraging and helpful. I think she was pretty proud that this is something she could share with me and I was able to pick up. We did laugh a few years later when she realized she had made me learn to quilt left handed (mirror image)!

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  58. Where I am from women who were my grandmothers age went to “housekeeping school” (not sure how to translate the word correctly) so they all know how to knit, crochet sew etc. maybe that is where the idea of “grandmothers style” comes from, since the basics that were taught were all for practical houskeeping-use I guess.

    I have never known my grandmother on my mothers side, since she passed away when my mother was still in her teens. Though from what I have heard about her she would take her children to the store to pick out clothes, look at the clothes and then she would make them at home (I wish I had that skill!!)

    My grandmother from my dads side was always knitting something during the cold days. I remember so many sweaters that she made for me and my dad ^^
    Any pattern that was brought to her was made, thought she didnt like very thick or very thin yarn (which I only start to understand now).
    It would have been nice if I could have shown my crochet projects to her, I think she would have liked sitting together working on projects and chatting, though she would probably try to correct my technique 😉

    So yeah, I guess my grannys werent oldfashioned in these things!

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  59. I am a grandma and I have only been crocheting for 5 years and self taught with a bit of help from you tube as a left handed person I had to try and convert some of the stitches from right to left then I discovered you tube and now there is no stopping me and I prefer to crochet as my mum taught me to knit when I was 5 but nobody I knew did crochet and was not fortunate to grow up with my grandparents as they died before I was born

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  60. My grandmother is an inspiration to me and was my first teacher. She taught me to knit & crochet. My first finished project was a very long pink knit scarf. I still love really long scarves! Though I am much more proficient with crochet. I tend to think her spirit guides me, approves of the work I do, and will always be a cranky but crafty inspiration to me (now a grandma). My fiber art is not the same as hers but it is as good.

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  61. Caroline Conway

    I would be over the moon if i could knit like my nanny(Irish here never called her grandma in my life) my nanny thought me how to knit and when I was up last week she handed me more wool because we both share a passion for crafts, although I find crocheting easier.?
    I rang my nanny today to wish her a happy 91st birthday and she told me she was knitting a cardigan for one of her daughter in laws. Respect your elders they have a lot of advice to share x

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  62. I am one of those — a Great Grandma actually. Each of my daughters I taught to knit but now they don’t. Two of my granddaughters I taught to knit but they don’t. I am sad about all the books and yarn and patterns they could get from me but will be gone. And I have a large garbage bag filled with knitted items – baby clothes, shawls, hats, etc. — that no one wants.
    But still I keep on knitting.
    Because it pleases me. Pleases my creative side. Fills my time and leaves behind a tangible souvenier of time spent.
    I still have a sweater my favorite Aunt knit for me over 30 years ago. It hasn’t been worn of years but it still stirs the memories and is a connection to that time. Maybe, one day, something I’ve made will do the same for one of them. Maybe, one day, they will try to create something for themselves or for someone they love. Maybe, one day, they will realize that each stitch they make is a tangible proof of love.
    And maybe, one day, they will realize that some of the “horrid patterns” from this Great-Grandma’s youth are now back in fashion. Or the skills can be used to create something new and modern and challenging.

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  63. Learned to crochet from my paternal grandmother. She worked mostly with crochet thread and wool yarn (she was married in the Victorian Era, so that tells you about how old I am…lol). Glad we have so many wonderful yarn options. I now mostly crochet for charities and wildlife re-habbers (yes, there are wildlife re-habbers that need our skills to help heal and/or raise animals displaced/hurt in natural disaster events!). Have a favorite crochet pattern for the first borns which it seems has turned into a family tradition. Anyone who subscribes to the many blogs and/or yarn purveyor websites knows that crochet/knit/loom crafting is alive and well! Long live the hooks & needles!

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  64. I am Grammy and Knit all the time. I take my knitting everywhere and people always enjoy finding out what I’m making. My Granddaughter lives everything I lake and helps design some things.

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  65. I was not taught to crochet by my grandmother…but was taught by a lady that was a grandmother when I was 5 years old. I love to crochet. I am a grandmother, a great grandmother, and a foster grandmother at a school teacher kindergarten children their abc’s

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  66. I am a proud Gramma to twin b/g 6 year olds. I am the first generation crocheter in my family. I had stopped crocheting for many years until my daughter and son came along and then I dabbled. I really got back into crocheting when my daughter started her photography business and I started making photo props for her. Bonnets, filler blankets, etc. Then came the twins and I have crocheted afghans for them as they have grown. I crochet for the relaxation as I have a very stressful job. I also do lots of crafts with my grandchildren which we enjoy immensely.

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  67. Yes, its not my grandma’s knitting but she taught me to knit and I still have all her needles. She once told my dad that she created a monster when the knitting lessons finally took hold at the ripe age of 34/86 (me/her). While she did lots of sweaters on size 3 straights, I am a circular girl and knit more than sweaters. Proud to say my grandma taught me to knit.

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  68. Mom tried to teach me to crochet for years growing up to no avail. I did however learn when she passed on it was like her knowledge came pouring put of my hands and soul. Now I’m an avid crocheter. And yes it is my mother’s crocheting.!!

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  69. I taught myself to crochet when I was nine and taught myself to knit when I was about 25. I have been doing it since. I am now 78 and my children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren are always asking me to make something. Right now I am making blankets for my three great-nephews and a great-niece. I have orders for five more blankets from the family. I enjoy doing this for them and they love them.

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  70. My Grandma could do any thing She could sew anything even without a pattern .. Crochet or knit I am not sure. I Crochet makes me relax.

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  71. I couldn’t learn to knit from my own grandmother as I am left handed and she was not. I was 6 and couldn’t wrap my head around doing the reverse of what she did.Fortunately the mother of one of my mom’s friends was left handed and had the patience to help m e. She was from eastern Europe so I learned continental and backwards but I soon learned how to compensate and read graphs in reverse.My own grandmother was a master knitter,crocheter and seamstress. If she could measure your bust with a string she always carried in her purse s he could make anything you wanted. I like to think that she is there cheering me on every time I wear something that I made.

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  72. My Grandma’s didn’t knit or crochet..My mom knitted for years.She taught me the basic,but lost interest.Years later,my mom was in her 80’s when she learned to crochet.My mom passed away in 2016 and now I am knitting and crocheting. Thanks to YouTube I am learning both..

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  73. My grandmother taught me how to knit when I was 8 or 9. We called her Nana B. I was the oldest of her grandchildren, and I think it was one of the best relationships I had with a grown-up. We had wonderful conversations about life, what I saw in movies and TV and how I felt about it. I remember her with love, sorry she died when I was 14

    My sister, the hooker, learned to crochet from our other grandmother. Sis is a leftie, and Nana O sat across the table from her.

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  74. I still have an ornament my grandmother crocheted for me – a pair of ice skates, with a paper clip as the blade. I have proudly displayed it on my tree for the past 40 years. My mother knits and crochets, and tried to teach all 5 of us girls. I knit, and taught my daughter to knit. I hope to see my granddaughter knit and crochet (she’s only 4 months old, so we will wait until she can walk & talk).

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  75. I looked forward every year to choosing a pair of mittens (or 2) from Nanas knitting basket. I learned to crochet when I was 13, but didn’t knit until I was 30. Became comfortable with knitting when I was 45ish. Now I wish my grandkids would be as excited to choose mittens I made, but they prefer gloves.

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  76. Both my grandmom’s were not Craftsy. I am a grandmom now and I know how much grandmom’s have an influence on the grandchildren. Now when I sit to crochet or knit, my grandson who is 3, mimicks my actions with his colour pencils as his knitting tools. Isn’t that amazing? Crafting is not anymore the domain of girls alone. I am definitely going to teach my grandson how to knit and crochet.
    Happy crafting. ❤️

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  77. Before my Grampa passed, their house had a HUGE basement that had only one use. “GRANNIE’S CRAFT ROOM”. Oh, she had it ALL, yarn, fabric, thread, sewing machines, dried apple dolls, Kewpie dolls, everything and anything a crafter could want. She taught me how to do the C2C, before I even knew what it was called. As far as I knew, it was my Grannie’s blanket stitch, and I’ll still refer to it as such at times.

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  78. I was very young when my grandmothers passed away but I loved them dearly. I am now an Oma and crochet constantly for my grandchildren. I am self taught and find crochet very therapeutic. I make cardigans, hats, blankets, mittens and toys. Thank you for your awe inspiring patterns!

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  79. My Grandmother was very onto crocheting and knitting. She taught my Aunt and my mother to crochet – they in turn taught me to do the same. I enjoy crocheting gifts to give away to familt and friends.

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